Center for Pediatric Research (NIH COBRE)

 Center for Pediatric Research (NIH COBRE)

Overview

Center Leadership

The Center’s goal is to establish a foundation of basic scientists with translational research projects studying developmental mechanisms underlying pediatric diseases. The Center provides a formalized training for young, independent scientists, as well as technical, administrative, and career development resources for affiliated members.

Alterations in the cell proliferation, morphogenesis, migration, differentiation, and programmed cell death are at the root of many pediatric diseases, often disrupted through genetic perturbations, aberrant fetal programming, altered growth & development, or environmental pressures.

Researchers within the Center utilize genetic, biochemical, cell, and molecular approaches to characterize alterations during development as they pertain to pediatric diseases and disorders. As a result, the Center for Pediatric Research is developing a strong foundation in basic and translational research by fostering a collaborative environment for scientists and physicians in South Dakota.


Sanford Research - Kurt Griffin  

David Pearce, PhD
Principal Investigator

Sanford Project - Zhiguang Guo Kyle Roux, PhD
Program Coordinator

 
External Advisory Committee

  

Projects 

Peter Vitiello, PhD
Thioredoxin Signaling During Pulmonary Development and Perinatal Oxidative Injury
 
 
 
 

Center Graduates

 
Jill Weimer, PhD
Rho GTPase Signaling in the Developing Cerebral Cortex
 
Lance Lee, PhD
Ciliary Central Pair Proteins in Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

Cores

Protein Biochemistry Core
Director: Kyle Roux, PhD

Molecular Pathology Core
Director: Haotian Zhao, PhD

Imaging Core
Director: Jill Weimer, PhD; Associate Director: Indra Chandrasekar, PhD

Molecular Pathology Core
Director: Director: Kristi Egland, PhD


Project leaders and other faculty in the Children’s Health Research Center also have regular access to the Molecular Pathology Core, the Flow Cytometry Core, and the Imaging Core, which are funded by COBRE grant 5P20GM103548 (Center for Cancer Biology Research).