August 2016, Drs. Roux was awarded a Sanford-Mayo Collaborative Research Grant for the 2016-2017 year. He will be working in partnership with Dr. Paul Galardy at the Mayo Clinic to study the mechanisms by which a regulator of epigenetics and DNA repair affects the progression of neuroblastoma, a common and highly aggressive tumor affecting children.

July 2016, Dr. Kyle Roux and members of his team, Dr. Daein Kim and Sam Jenson, recently published a book chapter that explores novel methods for investigating protein interactions in a cellular organelle known as the nuclear envelope which is a critical cellular structure in a myriad of cellular processes. The chapter, entitled “Identifying Protein-Protein Associations at the Nuclear Envelope with BioID” was published in the 2016 edition of Methods in Molecular Biology.

May 2016, Dr. Kyle Roux was recently invited to the University of Alberta to meet with faculty and discuss his ongoing research and technology development. The title of Dr. Roux’s invited lecture was: “Tracking protein footprints with BioID.”

April 2016, A research publication from the Roux Lab was recently recommended for Faculty of 1000 as being of special significance in its field. F1000Prime publishes recommendations of articles in biology and medicine from a faculty of around 10,000 scientists and clinical researchers aimed at highlighting highly significant research. The article entitled “An improved smaller biotin ligase for BioID proximity labeling” was recently published in the journal Molecular Biology of the Cell.

March 2016, The lab of Dr. Kyle Roux recently published a study entitled ” An improved smaller biotin ligase for BioID proximity labeling” in the journal Molecular Biology of the Cell. This study introduces improvements to BioID, a method invited by Dr. Roux that uses a promiscuous biotin ligase to detect protein-protein interactions in living cells.

January 2016, Dr. Kyle Roux and members of his lab recently co-authored a book chapter in Methods in Enzymology entitled “BioID Identification of Lamin-Associated Proteins.” This chapter discusses the use of BioID, a research technique developed by Dr. Roux, to elucidate novel lamin-interacting proteins and its applications in a broad range of biological systems, and provides detailed protocols to guide this new and innovative applications.